Forums/ The 7th Continent/ 2nd Kickstarter Campaign14 posts
Posted
I am intrigued by this game, unfortunately I only discovered it after the Kickstarter campaign for the "What goes up must come down" expansion ended.

I want to confirm future game availability. To my understanding:
1. There is a chance that the base game and all expansion content will be available for purchase on this website in Q1/Q2 2019 after all copies have reached Kickstarter members.
2. This game will not go to retail
3. The game will not be re-printed.

Is this correct?

I am willing to patiently wait until next year for an opportunity to purchase this product directly through Serious Poulp. I do NOT want to have to resort to paying scalpers fees for several reasons (least of all because it obviously costs more).
1. The money paid for this game deserves to go to the creators who have obviously labored for hundreds (probably thousands) of hours over this game
2. I feel safer paying money directly to Serious Poulp rather than an unknown third party who may or may not be honest about actually selling the product and stealing my money.
3. Scalping is morally corrupt and I strongly feel that scalpers should not profit in any way from some one else's hard work.

Thanks in advance for any replies.
Posted
You're 100% correct! :-)
I hope you'll be able to by a copy when the online shop open.
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Posted
I missed the campaign by a week and I´m really hoping that there will be some leftover copies for me and you (and all the other poor souls out there who missed to pledge).
Hopefully Serious Poulp has as soon as possible some news in that regard, i´m terribly nervous that i might be forced to buy from second hand for 200% the price to a guy i don´t know if he is trustful.
Posted
Do you have an estimate on when the shop will be open? Are we talking weeks or months?
Posted
LilCLinkin wrote:

3. The game will not be re-printed.

3. Scalping is morally corrupt and I strongly feel that scalpers should not profit in any way from some one else's hard work.

That's a bit strong. The scalpers would argue they helped fund the project when otherwise it might have struggled. Venture capitalist firms could be argued to be nothing more than greedy capitalist pigs, but then again, most of the companies they fund wouldn't exist without them, and some turn out to be massive drains on the venture capitalists (not all companies they fund are viable).

While I would much prefer to pay a higher fee to Serious Poulp for the game and expansions rather than a scalper, sadly, I missed the last window, so that is not an option. I had not even heard of this game at that time. I recognize that despite limited advertising, limited time window, and limited production, the scalpers did help SP accomplish what they set out to do with these limitations. Without the scalpers, it would have taken longer, required more word of mouth/advertising, and more money and greater risk. You could say they are a necessary evil if you still prefer the term evil. In a perfect world, SP would simply be able to fulfill orders on demand and not need KS or need backers. But this is not a perfect world.

The fact that SP has long stated it won't be reprinted creates an environment for scalpers to thrive in. Otherwise, if there were uncertainty about future reprints, scalpers would be taking on uncertainty themselves by investing in something that might turn out to be commoditized. So in a way, SP deserves some blame for the fact that Ebay is starting to fill up with shrink wrapped base sets the last few days as we enter the holiday season.
Posted
SethA wrote:
Do you have an estimate on when the shop will be open? Are we talking weeks or months?


The following sentence is right :
LilCLinkin wrote:
the base game and all expansion content will be available for purchase on this website in Q1/Q2 2019 after all copies have reached Kickstarter members.
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Posted
Resellers didn't have much of an effect on the making of this particular game (we blew past stretch goals with cash to spare) but they are helpful to gamers because they increase the supply. "Scalpers" take advantage of scarcity- there are only so many tickets to a concert, so buying 100 limits the ability of others to get hold of them. Ordering 100 copies of 7th Continent meant an additional 100 copies were produced, so if anything they give you a *better* chance of obtaining this game at a reasonable price.
Posted
And even in the case of scalping concert tickets, those people waited in line, called phone numbers endlessly, or sat at the computer in virtual line to get the tickets they resell later, so that those who couldn't be bothered to do the same, get to pay a markup for someone else doing the work for them. People may not like paying more for this "service" but nevertheless, scalpers are doing what "you" couldn't or wouldn't do, which is fight to get tickets when they first went on sale. It's not their fault "you" didn't. They are nothing more than middle men. Not a glorious profession, but middle men exist in almost every industry and are necessary. Certainly not immoral.
Posted
SethA wrote:
And even in the case of scalping concert tickets, those people waited in line, called phone numbers endlessly, or sat at the computer in virtual line to get the tickets they resell later, so that those who couldn't be bothered to do the same, get to pay a markup for someone else doing the work for them.

And by that making the need for being engaged into a need for being rich enough. I wouldn't even be against rich people paying someone to buy the tickets for them if they are to busy, but as it is practiced now it's more like someone cleaning your car without you wanting it and then charging you a fee for their work. There were more than just a few events where there were enough tickets for everyone who wanted to visit, but still people had to buy from scalpers because those grabbed the tickets only to sell them with a hefty markup.
Posted
Unisus wrote:
it's more like someone cleaning your car without you wanting it and then charging you a fee for their work.


So where you are from, you are first forced to attend a concert you don't want to see, and then pay for the ticket later? Strange customs...
Posted
Scalping is basically a form of investment. If someone invests in something like this (or tickets) and the demand isn't high enough they end up with a large stock of items they can't get rid of or have to sell at a cheaper price. It's a risk reward scenario, you also have to choose the right time to sell. I can understand the gripe when it comes to tickets for big events because of the limited quantity and time limit you have to purchase them within. Buying actual items to sell on like this isn't an old concept or particularly bad... it's basically the same as people who buy a product and keep it in mint condition to sell once production has stopped, there are games made while I was a kid I'd kill to have but cost a daft amount because they're rare and in good condition, but at least there's still a way of getting a good copy thanks to these guys!
Posted - Edited
SethA wrote:
Unisus wrote:
it's more like someone cleaning your car without you wanting it and then charging you a fee for their work.


So where you are from, you are first forced to attend a concert you don't want to see, and then pay for the ticket later? Strange customs...


Normally you would buy tickets yourself - but with scalpers taking away the tickets within minutes after sale opens (i'm not sure, but there was even under 1 minute once if i remember correctly), to attend a concert you are forced to pay for a service you didn't ask for - as you said that the scalpers are providing a service for those who want to buy tickets. If they would only provide their "service" for those who actually want that service, they wouldn't have to offer the tickets on the free market, as then they would already know their clients.

DukeKrostif wrote:
Scalping is basically a form of investment. If someone invests in something like this (or tickets) and the demand isn't high enough they end up with a large stock of items they can't get rid of or have to sell at a cheaper price. It's a risk reward scenario, you also have to choose the right time to sell. I can understand the gripe when it comes to tickets for big events because of the limited quantity and time limit you have to purchase them within. Buying actual items to sell on like this isn't an old concept or particularly bad... it's basically the same as people who buy a product and keep it in mint condition to sell once production has stopped, there are games made while I was a kid I'd kill to have but cost a daft amount because they're rare and in good condition, but at least there's still a way of getting a good copy thanks to these guys!


Buying stuff to keep it available later for an upmarked price is ok, but forcing yourself as a middleman between buyers and sellers is not really something we should see as something helpful. I mean we also are not ok with big companies claiming the rights for a well in afrika and then selling the people there the water they had for free all the time, or am i wrong?
Posted
That's a terrible analogy--equating your first world problems of buying life's luxuries, like going to see an Adele concert, to third world problems of life and death at the hands of warlords. What it really comes down to is you don't like paying more than you want to and you are stamping your foot like a toddler who didn't get their way. It seems that you don't understand that this is a fundamental issue of supply and demand, and that you don't have a right to expect that when demand is much higher than supply, you don't get to control the price you pay. You are part of the horde driving up demand so how do you get to complain? You are part of the problem! There might be other countries you can live in that rigorously control both supply and demand, but I can promise you, none of them are worth living in :-). Scalpers wouldn't exist if people weren't willing to pay more to get those last tickets to a concert. Scalpers also wouldn't exist if artists were forced to perform as many times in a city as there were fans who wanted to attend. Again, if you can't afford to pay for the service they are providing, you certainly could have gotten online when the tickets went on sale in the first place. The only reason events sell out in minutes is fan demand for that event is huge. Scalpers are only getting a small piece of it, as there's many more fans who are buying them at the same time. You make it sound as if Ticketmaster sells all the tickets just to scalpers. Scalpers are actually doing the vey thing you say is ok, which is keeping stuff available for a later upmarked price.

I find it interesting that you have a problem with scalpers, but you don't even mention Ticketmaster, who makes a ton more on this than scalpers do. They make the initial "convenience" fees, then they let the scalper resell the ticket on their very own site, charge the scalper another 15%, and the second buyer another 10% on top of all that. When buying a first-hand ticket, I certainly don't get to choose Ticketmaster as the broker, and I certainly don't find their fees "convenient". There's very little value provided, and I could do without their "service" as well. But they are a middleman that is also forced on us. So what are you going to do about it? Don't go if you don't like it. No one is making you buy a ticket to go to an event.

When I go to an electronics store, there's a salesperson who makes a commission on any item I buy. That person didn't provide any value to me, and most of the time I already knew what I would be buying, and they just tagged their name on the sale. Why do I have to pay their commission on my purchase? I could complain all day about people who I indirectly pay for things that I just don't like paying for, that were not helpful or did not add value. It's just part of life.

The fact is, you don't get to choose middle men. Unless you are far more important than I am, I certainly don't get to demand which transport company is used to get a product I'm buying to the store I'm buying it from. There are MANY middle men forcing their way in to get involved in EVERY purchase you make. I'm not sure what makes you think scalpers are any worse than the others, or the unionized labor that is often part of that middleman workforce. Every middleman involved adds their markup, plus profit. Just making this post transits hundreds of devices that were bought by ISPs (and hosting companies) who procured through many middlemen from the equipment manufacturers, none of which I personally chose to do business with. Scalpers are certainly no more immoral than Starbucks who takes a 5 cent commodity and turns it into a $2.50 mediocre drink, times a million per day. Why don't those bean growers get a bigger cut??? Dang it, it's downright immoral!!!!!
Posted - Edited
Ok, i'm sorry if my somewhat exaggerated comparison did hurt anyone's feelings. I'm known for bringing up extreme examples to clarify my point.

Also, i didn't talk about warlords, but about "respected" companies, which i know doesn't make the situation any better but rather worse.

That said, to equate contracted transporting companies with scalpers is, while not an absurdly exaggerated analogy, simply wrong.

But maybe we just have different definition for what a scalper is? In your example of buying a product in a store, the scalper isn't anyone in the chain from the manufacturer to the salesman in the store - those are all people involved in the process by contracts to assure a smooth process. Whether it's for your convenience (you don't have to search for a manufacturer selling you his product) or for better risk management (manufacturers often don't sell directly as they have contracts with distributors which give them more security in their business), all parties involved were contracted by one side or the other. The scalper would be the person standing at the front door of the store demanding a fee you have to pay so the open the door for you - a service not needed nor wanted, but they will keep the door shut until you pay.

A scalper doesn't buy things to assure availability, but to artificially lower supply, so the price raises when they resell. Scalpers are the people who go to a convention, grabbing all the promos laying out (yeah, there's a reason why you now have to ask for promos) and selling them for moon-prices on eBay.

Oh, and on the topic of Ticketmaster: i just never heard of them? You know, i personally don't visit concerts, festivals, sport-events or other such things. So i don't know that much about what companies are involved in buying tickets. That doesn't mean that i don't know about scalpers. And as i said before, if one of the two sides of a transaction sees the necessity of contracting someone to help them, that is their right. Now if you tell me that Ticketmaster forces the hosts of events to sell them their tickets, then i'll tell you that they are scalpers whether they are a "respected" company or not.

Oh, and not to forget: i also don't support Starbucks...
Forums/ The 7th Continent/ 2nd Kickstarter Campaign14 posts